Welcome

In October 2013, Hacking Pediatrics held the first hackathon ever focused on pediatric healthcare. It was sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital in collaboration with MIT's H@acking Medicine. In under 36 hours, 16 teams brought to life incredible ideas that will change the lives of children and their families. 

Hacking Pediatrics

In October 2013, Hacking Pediatrics held the first hackathon ever focused on pediatric healthcare. It was sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital in collaboration with MIT's H@cking Medicine. In under 36 hours, 16 teams brought to life incredible ideas that will change the lives of children and their families and we are doing it again this year. Hacking Pediatrics Hackathon 2.0 will once again bring together the most innovative minds to disrupt pediatric healthcare. 

The 2014 hackathon was held on October 17th -19th at the Microsoft NERD Center in Cambridge, MA.

Follow us on Twitter @HackPediatrics for the latest news!


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Some great tools to use when pitching an idea at a healthcare hackathon.


5 Can't-Miss Hackathons Happening for a Great Cause This Fall

Published September 17, 2014

Written by Shannon Nargi

The cold weather is officially moving in, Boston, and that means there's finally an excuse to stay inside on the computer all day and not feel (too) bad about it. But even we can admit that while setting up shop on your couch in sweats and surfing the Internet is a great way to spend your down time, there are more constructive ways to cash in all those hours on your laptop. And by that we mean one thing: hackathons.

This fall, there are some not-so-ordinary hackathons taking place in Boston for some extraordinary causes that need your help. There are prizes, which are great, but you better be jazzed about the purpose, too. From the first-ever city-wide food hack to creating solutions for pediatric health, we've rounded up five of the most exciting hackathons for you to get involved in this season. Read more>>


Do YOU have what it takes to be a mentor at a healthcare hackathon?

Are you a subject matter expert who wants to be a mentor at the 2014 Hacking Pediatrics Hackathon? The 2014 Hacking Pediatrics Hackathon will have a Mentor Genius Bar for our hackers to access some of the best thought leaders and subject matter experts in Boston. Does this sound like you? Apply by clicking the link below!


Listen to Michael Docktor's most recent interview with BostonMedical.TV.

Michael Docktor MD of Boston Children's Hospital talk to John Bennett, MD of BostonMedical.TV about his experience with Mobile Technology in the hospital setting, the use of iPads for Patient Education, and the creation of Hacking Pediatrics. 

Streamed live on Sep 4, 2014 and contains minor audio interruptions due to streamed bandwidth.


Wondering what to expect at a healthcare hackathon?

Check out the video below courtesy of the Kauffman Foundation and MIT Hacking Medicine. This was recorded at their Grand H@ckfest held back in March 2014. 


What’s driving millennials to health tech?

By Judy Wang, MS

(ITU/Rowan Farrell)

(ITU/Rowan Farrell)

If you Google the term “millennials,” you’ll see that Google automatically fills in such search terms as “millennials lazy,” “millennials spoiled,” “millennials trophy kids” and “millennials entitled.” Ouch.

As part of the Mayor’s ONEin3 Council and a Founding Hacker for MIT’sH@cking Medicine, I could not disagree more with this assessment of my generation. I’ve observed young people increasingly drawn to civically minded work with public impact—including work in health tech.

Several successful startup companies that formed out of H@cking Medicine hackathons, for example, were launched by entrepreneurs under the age of 35 (Smart Scheduling and PillPack, to name a few).

Given that talented young people could be working in other industries, why choose to be an entrepreneur in health tech? I posed this question to some young Boston-based entrepreneurs.

Read more>>


A very special thank you to the Child Life Department and patients at Boston Children's Hospital for building the LEGO's that created this video! 



Check out the amazing events being held all around the greater Boston area for our Hacking Pediatrics community and beyond! 


Together, let us unleash the imagination of our people.
— President Obama on the importance of making and manufacturing.

Entrepreneurial spirit just a start to ‘disrupt’ health care

Published April 2014

Fans of the reality TV show Shark Tank love to watch investors Mark Cuban and Daymond John make entrepreneurs sweat after they’ve delivered their pitches for money.

Less famous are the sharks who will circle Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston Monday for an event called Pilot Shark Tank. They’re doctors and nurses like Calum MacRae and Karen Conley, and they’ll be offering something that may be more valuable than money: a chance for health care entrepreneurs to pilot-test new technologies or services in their departments.

Over the last two years, Boston has seen a surge of hackathons, accelerator programs, innovation showcases, and other events designed to bring t-shirt clad entrepreneurs closer to physicians in lab coats. And that has produced a bumper crop of small startups with ideas for applying technologies such as smartphones, sophisticated data analytics, and Google Glass in the health care sector. Read more>>


Dr. Michael Docktor's presentation "Hacking Pediatrics 2013 - From Idea to Reality @ Warp Speed" presented at the December Innovator's Forum hosted by the Innovation Acceleration Program at Boston Children's Hospital.

Dr. Michael Docktor's presentation "Hacking Pediatrics 2013 - From Idea to Reality @ Warp Speed" presented at the December Innovator's Forum hosted by the Innovation Acceleration Program at Boston Children's Hospital.


Hacking Pediatrics News

VP Shunt, the 2013 Hacking Pediatrics Hackathon's 3rd Place Winner is Spotlighted in Boston Children's Hospital's Vector Blog

Hacking a solution for hydrocephalus… just not the one expected

by NANCY FLIESLER on MARCH 7, 2014

A project that set out to build better shunts ended with potential ways to help kids avoid shunts altogether.

Shunts often are surgically placed in the brains of infants with hydrocephalus to drain excess cerebrospinal fluid. Unfortunately, these devices eventually fail, and the problem is hard to detect until the child shows neurologic symptoms. CT and MRI scans may then be performed to check for a blockage of flow—followed by urgent neurosurgery if the shunt has failed. Full Story>>


Check out Hacking Medicine's awesome presentation "Hacking Medicine and the Rx It Offers for Innovation in All Industries" by Andrea Ippolito and Ally Yost. This webinar was recorded on 6/16/14 as part of the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series and provides great insight to the benefits of hacking and how you can get started in your organization. We just love our MIT Hacking Medicine friends! 


Interesting in all that is new in healthcare?

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Hacking Pediatrics

Hacking Pediatrics